Stories by Hamish Barwick

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BSA Australia offers $20K to software piracy whistle-blowers during July

The Business Software Alliance(BSA) Australia has brought back a $20,000 reward incentive that it last offered in 2010 in order to entice more Australians to report software piracy this month.

Stray animals in the sights of iCouncil app

Queensland-based local government authority, Tablelands Regional Council, is using an iPhone/iPad app called iCouncil to allow animal inspectors and residents to capture photos of stray animals and upload them to the Council’s website, saving time in reporting.

Security threats explained: Third party access

In this series, Computerworld Australia examines some of the information security threats facing small businesses and larger enterprises today. We’ve looked at hacktivism, social engineering and internal negligence and continue the series by speaking to security experts about the problem of third party access.

WA Auditor General finds government agencies still vulnerable to cyber security attacks

Little progress has been made with securing Western Australian government agencies against cyber security attacks according to the 2012 Information Systems Audit Report tabled by Western Australian Auditor General, Colin Murphy.

Telstra in the sights of Information Commissioner over data tracking

The Office of the Australian Information Commissioner (OAIC) has confirmed that it is in discussions with Telstra after the telco revealed it was tracking websites visited by Next G mobile customers and sending the information to a US-based company called Netsweeper.

Advanced persistent threats: What you need to know

Continuing Computerworld Australia’s recent series examining security threats, this week we talk to experts about the problem of advanced persistent threats (APTs).

Security threats explained: Hacktivism

In this series, Computerworld Australia examines some of the information security threats facing small businesses and larger enterprises today. We’ve looked at social engineering and internal negligence and continue the series by speaking to security experts about the problem of hacktivism.

Western Water avoids drowning in data with storage upgrade

Victorian water authority, Western Water, has implemented a new 256TB capacity storage system to cope with 50 per cent year on year data growth, in part fuelled by a state-wide smart meter project aimed at better understanding water usage.

Supercomputer, second data centre fuels Uni. of Auckland networking upgrade

The University of Auckland (UoA) is gearing up for a sharp increase in traffic over its network thanks to a new supercomputer, housed at UoA, and through the August 2012 launch of a 439 square metre capacity second data centre.

Automated online banking fraud tool emerges

Trend Micro has warned of an automatic transfer system (ATS) tool which has been used to infect users’ computers and then bypass their bank account security measures, such as two-factor authentication, in the UK, Germany and Italy.

Security threats explained: Social engineering

In this series, Computerworld Australia examines some of the information security threats facing small businesses and larger enterprises today. We’ve looked at internal negligence and continue the series by speaking to experts about the problem of social engineering.

Trend Micro A/NZ hires new managing director from global ranks

Security vendor Trend Micro Australia and New Zealand has announced a replacement from within its global ranks for outgoing managing director Dave Patnaik who is leaving the company after four years.

Q&A: NextDC CEO, Craig Scroggie

NextDC’s (ASX:NXT) new chief executive, Craig Scroggie, recently spoke to Computerworld Australia about what attracted him to the role after serving as managing director of Symantec Australia and where the data centre operator is heading in the future.

Privacy Commissioner condemns RailCorp over USB drive auction

RailCorp’s auction of USB keys in 2011 did not meet obligations under the Privacy and Personal Information Protection (PPIP) Act 1998 because the thumb drives, which were lost property, contained personal information not protected against unauthorised access, according to a report released by the New South Wales Office of the Privacy Commissioner.

Apple changes OS X security messages

In the wake of the Flashback botnet which targeted Mac computers, Apple has removed a statement from its messages on its website that the operating system X (OS X) isn't susceptible to viruses.

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