Stories by Loek Essers

Amsterdam traffic controllers offer commuters personalized route advice

Ever get stuck in your daily commute? That happens to people in Amsterdam too. But with a new smartphone app that provides free personal route advice based on the latest traffic conditions, Dutch commuters could soon be avoiding annoying traffic jams on their way home.

New lie detector relies on full-body suit for better accuracy

When you are hooked up to a polygraph lie detector there is only a 60 percent chance a skilled examiner will spot a lie, giving you pretty good odds to get away with one or two untruths. However, Dutch and British scientists have found a way to amp up the accuracy of lie detection to 75 percent by monitoring a suspect's movements with a full-body suit.

Yes, US workers do still need their email

The end of email has been foretold many times, but despite these predictions of doom, U.S. workers can't seem to get rid of it.

In 2015, EU aims to sweep away old rules on data protection and copyright

The European Commission is gearing up to solve some longstanding problems with outdated copyright and data protection laws and move ahead on new rules for roaming charges and net neutrality.

Cyberattack on German steel factory causes 'massive damage'

A German steel factory suffered massive damage after hackers managed to access production networks, allowing them to tamper with the controls of a blast furnace, the government said in its annual IT security report.

Microsoft files suit against alleged tech support scammers

Microsoft is finally cracking down on scammers who offer to fix non-existent computer problems for hundreds of dollars. In a first strike, Microsoft sued several U.S. companies it said are involved in fake tech support scams.

Microsoft kills EU browser choice screen

Microsoft has retired the browser choice screen it agreed to show new Windows users in the European Union as part of an antitrust settlement.

Netflix wins Dutch patent suit, can keep operating as usual

European Netflix users, breathe easy: The video streaming service can keep operating as it always did now that Dutch patent lawsuit has been thrown out of court.

Dutch regulator asks Facebook to hold off on privacy update, is rebuffed

Saying that Facebook's new privacy policy could violate Dutch data protection laws, the privacy regulator in the Netherlands has asked it to postpone its introduction pending an investigation. But the social network won't hold back the rollout of new terms and policies on Jan. 1, and was "surprised and disappointed" by the data protection authority's move, a spokeswoman said.

Dutch authority to Google: change privacy policy or else

If Google doesn't change how it handles users' private data by the end of February, it may face fines of €15 million (about US$18.6 million), the Dutch Privacy Authority said Monday.

Booking.com proposes settling price parity antitrust cases across Europe

Hotel reservation site Booking.com has offered to settle antitrust cases brought against it in Sweden, France and Italy, and on Monday antitrust authorities invited hotels to give their views on the settlement.

UberPop will be banned in France from Jan. 1st

Ride-sharing service UberPop will be banned in France from Jan. 1, a government official said Monday, as Paris taxi drivers blocked traffic around the capital in protest at a court decision Friday not to impose an emergency ban on the service.

More trouble brewing for Uber in Brussels

There is more trouble brewing for ride-hailing service Uber in Brussels where the minister for mobility announced he will file a complaint with the police to take the company's site offline in Belgium.

Google sued in Germany over video streaming patent

Google and YouTube have been sued in Germany for allegedly infringing on a video streaming patent owned by U.S. software company Max Sound. The case could lead to sales bans on several Google Android products.

Skype implicated in EU corporate income tax scandal

Skype used two Luxembourg companies and an Irish subsidiary to avoid paying corporate income tax during a five year period, according to documents detailing deals with Luxembourg tax authorities.