Stories by Lamont Wood

Beyond FLOPS: The co-evolving world of computer benchmarking

It used to be simple: Multiply the microprocessor's clock rate by four, and you could measure a computer's computational power in megaFLOPS (millions of floating point operations per second) or gigaFLOPS (billions of FLOPS.)

Boost your security training with gamification -- really!

Getting employees to take security seriously can be a game that everyone wins.

AI gets its groove back

Thanks to the advent of Big Data, new algorithms and massive, affordable computing power, artificial intelligence is now, finally, on a roll again.

Location-based services: Controversy at every level

Your smartphone can be a beacon telling the world where you are, with increasing precision. Is that good commerce or bad privacy, or maybe a bit of both?

Malware: War without end

Ceaselessly, with no end in sight despite outlays that amount to a tax on doing business, the decades-long struggle against malware drags on.

Hackathons for the rest of us

Forget softball games. Hackathons promote togetherness among techies while benefiting the enterprise, and no one gets pitcher's elbow.

Surprise: Mobile devices don't help office ergonomics

For generations, office ergonomics involved various measures intended to keep employees productive while they remained in their chairs. New thinking and new devices are changing all that.

Dragon NaturallySpeaking 12 Premium review: Accurate voice recognition

Dragon NaturallySpeaking is the premiere voice-recognition software package. Its latest version adds additional accuracy.

Incubator grows firms via geek service swaps

The tenants at this tech-oriented co-working space/business incubator have a resource they could not tap elsewhere: one another. Collaboration with strangers is, in fact, required for membership.

Blind and online: Progress, not perfection, for visually impaired tech users

Advances in accessible interfaces - especially by Apple - have been beneficial for the blind, but the Web remains a minefield of accessibility problems.

Today, printers. Tomorrow, 'integrated peripherals'?

Out went 42 aging black and white copiers with interface boxes that let them serve as printers. In went 42 new networked multi-function printers (MFPs) that could do color printing and copying and scan directly to e-mail, fax or files. And the owner, the Park Hill School District in Kansas City, MO, saves $19,000 yearly.

Printer ink: Tired of feeding the cash cow?

Human blood costs about $17.27 an ounce, silver about $34 an ounce. But both are bargains compared to the ink sold to the owners of inkjet printers, which can exceed $80 an ounce. Meanwhile, the ink used to print newspapers costs about 16 cents an ounce.

Phones become electronic wallets

In a recent pilot project, about 30 regular guests at a Clarion Hotel in Stockholm were given smartphones enabled with Near Field Communication technology, enabling them to bypass the check-in counter and access their rooms by tapping their phones on an NFC reader, which replaced the typical card-swipe door lock.

Gamification goes mainstream

Increased sales, increased participation, increased engagement. It doesn't sound like a game, but those are some of the goals, and reported achievements, of the new field of "gamification."

Future world: Today, the Internet - tomorrow, the Internet of Things?

Embedded in the heel of his shoe was an early example of the Internet of Things -- but Andrew Duncan didn't know it at the time.