Stories by Brandon Butler

Amazon: New analytics tool can scrutinise massive amounts of data

Amazon Web Services this week rolled out a new cloud-based data analytics tool named Kenesis, which can analyze massive amounts of data in real time and be paid for by the hour.

Amazon hints at details on its CIA Franken-cloud

Amazon Web Services recently won a reported $600 million contract to build the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) a cloud. But that cloud will not look like any other cloud on the planet.

Amazon ratchets up enterprise cloud focus

If there's one overarching theme of Amazon Web Services' second annual cloud user conference, it's that this company is aiming for enterprise.

In Pictures: Hot new products from Amazon's Cloud show

Amazon's re:Invent conference is a hot place to show off the latest and greatest tools for the Cloud

Verizon cozies up with Cloud Foundry as PaaS market heats up

Verizon, which just recently launched a major overhaul to its cloud platform, today announced plans to integrate the VMware/EMC-backed Cloud Foundry open source platform as a service (PaaS) initiative into its offering.

5 things to watch for at Amazon's Cloud show

Last year some 6000 attendees trekked out to Las Vegas for the first customer conference of what many consider to be the leading public IaaS Cloud provider: Amazon Web Services. AWS re:Invent 2012 saw the launch of a new data analytics and warehousing product, price drops on its services, and lots of tips and tricks for how to use Amazon's cloud.

Rightscale launches analytics on top of multi-cloud management tool

RightScale today came out with new functionality for its cloud management portfolio that helps customers not only control resources from multiple public clouds but also provide analytical insight about how those resources are being used.

Microsoft Azure gaining ground on Amazon Web Services

Amazon Web Services next week will host its second customer conference, which is sure to grab headlines and be the center of cloud industry discussion. But, as Amazon continues its run leading the IaaS market, Microsoft has slowly but surely been building up its Windows Azure cloud with the intention of giving AWS a run for its money.

Cloud news: Amazon targets high-speed graphics; Rackspace boosts VM performance

Two of the leading Cloud computing providers have announced significant revisions to their on-demand virtual machines, with Rackspace rolling out new higher performing SSD-based VMs, and Amazon Web Services reducing the prices on one class of its VMs and introducing a service for graphics processing.

Cisco puts its unified computing servers into OpenStack clouds

The top executives leading Cisco's OpenStack efforts today said customers can run the open source cloud computing platform with its Unified Computing System (UCS) and Nexus hardware devices, and that the company will provide advanced support to help customers deploy OpenStack clouds.

Free cloud storage service MegaCloud goes dark

The website for MegaCloud, a provider of free and paid consumer cloud storage, is inaccessible and users of the service are complaining on social media sites that they have not had access to their data for days.

IBM to nix SmartCloud Enterprise, migrate customers to newly acquired SoftLayer cloud

IBM has informed its customers that it will be phasing out its SmartCloud Enterprise cloud computing platform and is offering free migration of workloads to SoftLayer's cloud, which IBM recently purchased.

What's holding back the cloud industry?

While cloud enthusiasts roaming the halls of McCormick Place convention hall in Chicago last week at Cloud Connect may be high on the market, the reality is that many enterprises IT shops are still reticent to fully embrace public cloud computing.

Startup offers hefty storage with pay-per-use pricing

The model of buying cloud computing resources is different from that of buying traditional hardware and software. Instead of buying licenses and investing in equipment, in a cloud computing model, users pay for the resources they use – no more, no less. That model has been proven out extensively on the compute side, with services like Amazon's Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), and a variety of other IaaS offerings on the market. But storage has been slow to catch up.

Products vs. distros: Debate rages in OpenStack community

What's the better way to consume an open source platform: A productized version, or a pure distribution of the code?