Vodafone and Nokia collaborate on mobile edge computing

Companies collaborate on public safety potential of MEC

Vodafone Hutchison Australia and Nokia are collaborating on a Mobile Edge Computing proof of concept that leverages the telco’s 4G network.

MEC involves shifting applications closer to the edge of a mobile network, potentially offering significant benefits when it comes to latency and congestion. The Vodafone and Nokia collaboration is focussed on public safety applications, such as analysing video feeds from sources such as CCTV cameras that are connected to the telco’s network.

Video analytics trials will be conducted next year.

“This smart technology has been designed to take the manual work out of security monitoring and could be used, for instance, by airports, shopping centres, or at large sporting events,” Vodafone’s general manager technology strategy, Easwaren Siva, said in a statement.

“The Nokia Mobile Edge Computing platform rapidly processes content at the network edge, closer to users to ensure an ultra-low latency experience,” said Nokia’s head of Oceania, Ray Owen.

“For these demonstrations, the data feeds from the camera remained local thanks to the MEC platform while benefiting from the robust, secure capabilities of 4G, which is critical public safety communications.”

Vodafone last month signed up to a new Nokia-led group that aims to boost the use of 4G LTE technology by public safety agencies as well as the adoption of associated standards.

The new Mission Critical Communications Alliance has more than 10 members including public safety agencies and mobile network operators, according to Nokia.

The two companies also recently staged a trial of 5G mobile technology in Australia.

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