New SSL server rules go into effect Nov. 1

CAs will reject requests for internal SSL server certificates that don't conform to new internal domain naming and IP address conventions

Public certificate authorities (CAs) are warning that as of Nov. 1 they will reject requests for internal SSL server certificates that don't conform to new internal domain naming and IP address conventions designed to safeguard networks.

The concern is that SSL server digital certificates issued by CAs at present for internal corporate e-mail servers, Web servers and databases are not unique and can potentially be used in man-in-the-middle attacks involving the setup of rogue servers inside the targeted network, say representatives for the Certification Authority/Browser Forum (CA/B Forum), the industry group that sets security and operational guidelines for digital certificates. Members include the overwhelming bulk of public CAs around the globe, plus browser makers such as Microsoft and Apple.

"Even in an internal network, it's possible for an employee to stand up a fake server," says Rick Andrews, senior technical director for trust services at Symantec, explaining the new rules.

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The problem today is that network managers often give their servers names like "Server1" and allocate internal IP addresses so that SSL certificates issued for them through the public CAs are not necessarily globally unique, notes Chris Bailey, general manager for Deep Security for Web Apps at Trend Micro.

"People rely on these internal names today," Bailey says. But "if someone hacks in, they can set up a man-in-the-middle domain."

The CA/B Forum three years ago reached the conclusion this was a significant security issue and nailed down new certificate-issuance guidelines they have been sharing with their customers. Now that the Nov. 1 deadline is getting closer, they are speaking out about it.

As of Nov. 1, network managers requesting internal SSL certificates from the public CAs will have to following these new guidelines. Network managers will need to ensure SSL server certificate requests are expressed in a way that they are associated with an external domain name, says Andrews. Some enterprises already use names that chain up to the company name, but "these are probably in the minority," he adds.

MORE WORK FOR YOU?

This change to requirements pertaining to public issuance of internal SSL server certificates means that in some instances, network managers may need to expand their internal DNS infrastructure so the name maps appropriately, Andrews points out. For some, particularly large organizations with sprawling networks, it could be a painful set of changes, even impacting the applications running on these servers, he acknowledges.

For any organization or network manager not wishing to adhere to the new public CA issuance guidelines, there are a few alternatives, though Andrews says many may not find them appealing. Organizations can decide not to obtain publicly-issued SSL certificates for internal servers and instead start privately issuing digital certificates on their own by relying on their own management hierarchy. But Web browsers might not necessarily recognize these private certificates and more changes might need to occur to ensure they do.

One other CA/B Forum deadline to keep an eye on: Oct. 1, 2016. By then, any SSL certificates issued for internal domains that don't meet the new standards will be revoked. Organizations that determine they must make changes to meet the CA/B Forum guidelines now have about two years to migrate.

Ellen Messmer is senior editor at Network World, an IDG website, where she covers news and technology trends related to information security. Twitter: MessmerE. E-mail: emessmer@nww.com

Tags AppleforumsymantecsecurityMicrosoftSSL

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