NSW government invites RFPs from ICT shared services applicants

Follows registration of interest (ROI) phase in March 2014

The NSW government has invited 50 companies that filled out a registration of interest (ROI) for ICT shared services in March 2014 to submit their plans via a request for proposal (RFP) process.

NSW minister for finance and services Dominic Perrottet said he wants to “get the process right” and is giving providers one month to lodge a detailed RFP application.

The RFP is taking place because the NSW government wants to adopt a new shared services delivery model. Currently, this function is provided by the government’s shared services agency, ServiceFirst.

ServiceFirst employs 350 people and delivers services including human resources, ICT, analysis, financial reporting and compliance to 7,500 customers from more than 40 NSW government agencies.

“There is no doubt that the services we receive through ServiceFirst are improving. However, we are open to different delivery models if it leads to better services, reduced costs and increased productivity,” Perrottet said in a statement.

NSW finance and services staff will evaluate the RFP proposals, with a final outcome expected by December 2014.

Perrottet added that any decision will be made on the basis that a new ICT shared services model “reduces operating costs” for NSW state government agencies.

The proposal is part of the NSW government’s wider 2013-2014 ICT Strategy, which is designed to get better value out of its $2 billion annual spend on technology.

As part of this strategy, NSW agencies will be required to move from 130 existing decentralised government data centres into two whole-of-government facilities at Silverwater and Unanderra by 31 December 2015. The two data centres are operated by Nextgen Group subsidiary Metronode. The vendor was awarded a $182 million contract to build the facilities in May 2012.

In addition, the NSW government sold its shares in IT services company ac3 to Sydney-based systems integrator Kilkon Solutions for an undisclosed sum in December 2013. ac3 provides infrastructure, cloud and collaboration services to more than 50 government agencies.

At the time, NSW minister for finance and services Andrew Constance said the sale was part of a transition away from providing ICT services to buying services from suppliers.

Follow Hamish Barwick on Twitter: @HamishBarwick

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Tags ICT strategyNSW Governmentshared servicestenders

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