NBN Co will need to bring on 100,000 premises per month to meet 2020 deadline: Switkowski

“We will have to bring on 100,000 premises a month every month for 8 years” said NBN Co chairman Ziggy Switkowski

NBN Co chairman Ziggy Switkowski.

NBN Co chairman Ziggy Switkowski.

NBN Co chairman Ziggy Switkowski has conceded that NBN Co will need to bring on 100,000 premises a month every month for the next eight years to meet its 2020 deadline for the National Broadband Network (NBN) rollout.

Speaking at an Ai Group Business event today, Switkowski told delegates that the required run rate to get the “job done by 2020ish” means it will have to bring on 100,000 premises a month every month for eight years.

“At the moment we are passing 6000 premises a week, so we have to increase that,” he said.

“At this stage, we have built around 500,000 premises. We only have 11.5 million to go,” he joked.

Switkowski was asked by a delegate if 100 megabits per second (Mbps) will be fast enough in the year 2020.

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The NBN Co chairman said that Australia has gone from 256 kilobits per second in 2004 to an average 6 to 8 Mbps in 2014.

“If you continue that growth and you see what is driving demand which is video and online services, 100 Mbps on average will be right. If you are a demanding household which requires you to have a dozen teenagers, than you will be able to find a high speed service,” he joked.

NBN Co last year conducted carried out a strategic review which recommended a move away from a primarily fibre-to-the-premise (FTTP) rollout to a multi-technology mix that would include fibre-to-the-node and fibre-to-the-basement or distribution point (FTTB/DP).

TPG’s competing rollout of an FTTB product to buildings was also mentioned by Switkowski.

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“TPG have flagged that they are going to start marketing that service. We have indicated to the industry that this is unhelpful and over time it is unwise,” he said.

NBN Co's chief executive, Bill Morrow, has warned that buildings that sign up for TPG's FTTB rollout could run the risk of being stuck with a single RSP.

"The NBN levels the playing field for Australian telecommunications and creates real and vibrant competition," Morrow said in April.

"We can make this statement because the NBN doesn’t sell directly to consumers and is open to all retail service providers to use on equal terms. Vertically integrated carriers — companies that both own networks and market to consumers — cannot offer those same guarantees."

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6 Comments

Abel Adamski

1

Malcolm and Bills and Ziggy's problem.
They and their handpicked team will be accountable, discounting Telstra's actions The original team was reasonably on track. That Asbestos halt (the issue was known for decades and had introduced delays for over a year befor it conveniently blew up before the election, stopping the rollout.
What did they think the sunnies were going to do - they obtained other longish term work, some discarded their fibre handling terminating equipment, Obviopusly Politically Motivated, Now the consequences of lack of workers.
Hoist by their own Petard

Abel Adamski

2

Malcolm and Bills and Ziggy's problem.
They and their handpicked team will be accountable, discounting Telstra's actions The original team was reasonably on track. That Asbestos halt (the issue was known for decades and had introduced delays for over a year befor it conveniently blew up before the election, stopping the rollout.
What did they think the subbies were going to do - they obtained other longish term work, some discarded their fibre handling terminating equipment, Obviopusly Politically Motivated, Now the consequences of lack of workers.
Hoist by their own Petard

Greg

3

Well with all the budget cutbacks and as the Lib's can not be trusted as they say one thing then another I can see this project being completed in 2025? At which time the original FTTN sites will be that old and worn out they will need replacing or moving to another system. The manufacturers will not be making those nodes in 2025, so it appears in the long run FTTP would have been the better option.
Turnbill got his yes man puppies to do what he wanted.
100 000 homes / premises a month lol as if that will ever happen. The NBN can not do more than 10 000 a month. I will not be holding my breath as out location is due to start being commenced sometime in the next 3 years. See what happens.

Kick this mob out.

4

The abbott/murdoch coalition have installed their puppets, turncoat and ziggy to do their bidding which is, in abbotts words, "destroy the NBN". Abbott looks like he will at least keep that promise. Why should we believe anything these anti Australian self interested muppets say? Election now before it's too late!

Goresh

5

Given that pretty much everyone today already agrees that 6-8Mbps is inadequate (why else are we building an NBN), what sense is there to spending billions to build a network that will be inadequate when complete.

The network of today doesn't cut it because of lack of spend on infrastructure. NBNco is now talking a massive infrastructure spend just to match the inadequacies of todays offering.

Do it once and do it right.

Pete Petrass

6

CHEAPER - well it only took them around 8 months apparently to discover the billions of "hidden costs", we still have no costing for buy/lease of copper CAN and HFC, no costing for 5 years later upgrade to FTTP - this will definitely not be cheaper - FAIL
FASTER - I don't think they will find anyone to admit that up to 25Mbps is any where near being faster than 1Gbps - FAIL
SOONER - they are curently going at around 1/4 the rollout speed required so on Ziggy's calculations on current speed it will be finished in 2044 - FAIL
So here we are in the year 2044 with most of Australia getting around 25-50Mbps on their "super fast broadband" whilst the rest of the planet is doing 2Gbps or greater. WOW what a fantastic future to look forward to.

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