Amazon and Microsoft drop cloud storage prices by up to 50%

Microsoft will continue to match Amazon's prices

Last April, Microsoft committed to matching Amazon's Web Services' (AWS') prices for compute, storage and bandwidth.

So when Amazon announced on Thursday it will drop its S3 (Simple Storage Service) and Elastic Block Store (EBS) prices by up to 22%, Microsoft followed suit the very next day.

"We are matching AWS' lowest prices (US East Region) for S3 and EBS, reducing prices by up to 20% and making the lower prices available in all regions worldwide," Microsoft posted in its official blog today.

Amazon S3 Storage price reduction chart.

For Microsoft's "Locally Redundant Disks/Page Blobs Storage," the company is reducing prices by up to 28%. It is also reducing the price of Azure Storage service by 50%.

Amazon's new prices take effect Feb. 1. Microsoft's price cuts begin March 13.

"We're also making the new prices effective worldwide, which means that Azure storage will be less expensive than AWS in many regions," Microsoft said.

Amazon said it dropped its prices for its S3 storage by 22% and its EBS standard volume storage and I/O operations by up to 50%.

Amazon's EBS price chart.

Lucas Mearian covers consumer data storage, consumerization of IT, mobile device management, renewable energy, telematics/car tech and entertainment tech for Computerworld. Follow Lucas on Twitter at @lucasmearian or subscribe to Lucas's RSS feed. His e-mail address is lmearian@computerworld.com.

See more by Lucas Mearian on Computerworld.com.

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