Meet Windows Server's BYOD features

Four of the features in Windows Server 2012 R2 are meant to bridge the gap between yesterday's world, where users have a corporate-issued laptop and a BlackBerry, and today's new BYOD environment

Microsoft execs are fond of the term "people-centric IT" -- it's their way of saying that workers are using whatever devices they want to, and are using them at home, on the train, in a hotel, on the beach, while skiing.... You get the idea. But IT needs a way to at least make sure this explosion of user choice does not put corporate data at risk.

Four of the features in Windows Server 2012 R2 are meant to bridge the gap between yesterday's world, where users have a corporate-issued laptop and a BlackBerry, and today's new BYOD environment, where users bring their own phones to work, use their personal tablets, work from a variety of locations and generally have a varied approach to how they engage with computer resources.

The new workplace join feature

Up until now, a Microsoft machine -- laptop, desktop, server, tablet or anything else -- was either a member of a domain and therefore able to be managed by the enterprise tools available inside the Windows Server ecosystem, or was a member of a workgroup and thus did not participate in the security profile of another group of computers. Home machines were typically in workgroups and corporate machines were usually members of a domain.

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Comments

Adam

1

BYOD will continue growing as mobile devices continue to play a greater role in our lives. That's why so many major IT players like Microsoft are offering solutions to address such BYOD challenges as security and device management.

Does BYOD come with headaches? Of course it does. However, security issues and IT management headaches (how do I support all those devices?) can be addressed by using new HTML5 technologies that enable users to connect to applications and systems without requiring IT staff to install anything on user devices. For example, Ericom AccessNow is an HTML5 RDP client that enables remote users to securely connect from iPads, iPhones and Android devices to any RDP host, including Terminal Server and VDI virtual desktops, and run their applications and desktops in a browser. This enhances security by keeping applications and data separate from personal devices.

Since AccessNow doesn't require any software installation on the end user device – just an HTML5 browser, network connection, URL address and login details - IT staff end up with less support hassles. The volunteer or temporary employee that brings in their own device merely opens their HTML5-compatible browser and connects to the URL given them by the IT admin.

Visit http://www.ericom.com/BYOD_Workplace.asp?URL_ID=708 for more info.

Please note that I work for Ericom

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