What's life really like with the NBN?

NBN Co says there are now just under 1100 premises passed in Willunga and almost half of all premises have signed up for an NBN service.

Image by G Meyer  / http://www.flickr.com/people/kainet/ (Creative Commons).

Image by G Meyer / http://www.flickr.com/people/kainet/ (Creative Commons).

Everyday Marketing Solutions

Gary Lodge, business owner of Everyday Marketing Solutions, also took part in early education sessions about the NBN and free trials on the network run by Telstra.

He also encountered some early problems in the wake of switching to the NBN, though in his case related to his on-premise wireless network.

“There were a lot of teething problems, which were pretty frustrating at times when the internet wasn’t available or there were technical problems. [But] that’s to be expected, I think, with any new technology or new system coming into the town,” he says.

He experienced problems with the wireless router in his double brick home, with the connection not reaching all areas of his premise.

Lodge says this required getting Telstra to put in signal boosters. However, there were also issues with boosters breaking down.

“They just tried some different things – just a bit of trial and error to get everything up and running with the speeds working how it should,” he says.

Overall Lodge is happy with the NBN and has not had any problems since and says the network is helping his marketing and website creation business.

Often going out to meet locals in the area, Lodge says businesses are becoming more aware that they need to adapt to new technology and change the way they are doing things and the NBN has become a way to market his business.

“The [businesses] that are finding it tough tend to blame the government or blame somebody else for their problems. They’re the ones who haven’t changed and they’re still doing things like they were doing 20 years ago,” he says.

“So it’s been a bit of a kick up the backside for a lot of people who have said ‘Yes, we do need to do something to change the way we do business’.”

Everyday tasks have become easier, such as sending large files online and communicating with staff who don't live locally via online video.

Lodge is paying around $20 to $30 more for his NBN plan than his ADSL as Telstra requires him to still have a copper phone line.

“That’s one thing that I’m a bit disappointed with,” he says. “There are no packages without that. We never used that home phone before because we’ve got mobiles, but we had to have it to get broadband.”

OzFeathers

Linda Sanders, creative director at Oz Feathers, has been on the NBN for just over a year and is a strong supporter of the network.

As part of the OzFeathers business, a Web-based business that designs marketing banners, Sanders sends large files to customers. Previously, these had to be sent in the mail.

Sending files of any size was an arduous process on her dial-up connection, which she was using until around 2010 when she was finally able to connect to ADSL.

With only 5GB of data, she frequently exceeded her limit, despite not downloading large files or streaming videos.

Oz feathers is now on an Internode 12/1Mbps plan.

“Since 13-14 months ago, we’ve had reliable Internet – we’ve never had to worry about the Internet not working [and] we’ve never had to worry about too many people [being] online at once,” Sanders says.

The NBN has also helped increase her confidence in uploading videos and using YouTube. She can now also communicate with clients via Skype.

“Having the NBN helping our business just means that we can communicate with Korea or Thailand without worrying about the quality of the phone line or the speed of email or the size of email. It’s just opened our thinking to outside our local domain,” she says.

“We live locally, but everything we do is global.”

Like others, Sanders says she is paying more for her Internet, but she is receiving a greater download limit. Previously paying $29.95 a month, she is now paying $49.95 a month and also has a phone line on the copper network with Telstra.

Sanders says although the NBN has done wonders for her business, there has been a lack of education and awareness about the network and what users could expect.

For example, the installation of the NBN box, the Network Termination Unit.

“Someone just rocked up on the doorstep and said ‘here we are’ with a screwdriver in hand,” she says.

“We had no idea what the box was or where it should go or what we did with it once it was there. We had to turn them away because where they wanted to put it was ridiculous because it was on the outside of the building.

“The next stage would have been to drill through a 30cm solid stone wall and come out in the middle of our bedhead.”

Sanders eventually built a cupboard to house the box in.

Once the NBN connection was live, she says it has been “amazing” and there has been only been one further glitch in her connection, which caused an outage for around four hours.

“It’s a way forward for Australia,” she says. “We’re looking forward to the future and what the NBN will be doing when our grandchildren go to school and we’ll be able to follow along with them and they’ll be teaching us [things]. It’s a big learning curve but it’s fantastic.”

Follow Stephanie McDonald on Twitter: @stephmcdonald0

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Tags National Broadband Network (NBN)NuSkopeTelstraWillunga

More about InternodemobilesSkypeTelstra Corporation

11 Comments

Bruce H

1

How come they have had to keep a T$ copper line? Is that to keep the same phone number - doesn't T$ allow porting?

Danny

2

Its a Telstra condition, another good reason to shop around and find a better service provider

Another Danny

3

Sounds like both OzFeathers and EveryDay Marketing Solutions both chose to keep a landline rather than using the NBN for voice. This appears to be successful Telstra marketing. Unfortunately. $20-$30 / month = $240 - $360 wasted annually.

Simon

4

'Chose' could just mean they are currently still in contract with Bigpond/Telstra, and didn't want to pay a potentially large break fee.

It could also mean that they're not aware of alternate ISPs or their offerings.

Ultimately, it reduces Telstra's competitiveness on the NBN and it will be interesting to see if this add on price continues once the copper is removed (a charge for UNI-V port perhaps?).

Abel Adamski

5

Thank you Stephanie for publishing real world experience warts and all with a balanced article. Good to know warts and all, remember it is a trial site and lessons will have been learnt, that is what trials are about.

Abel Adamski

6

Another Danny
Read the article
"Lodge is paying around $20 to $30 more for his NBN plan than his ADSL as Telstra requires him to still have a copper phone line."
Lodge is paying around $20 to $30 more for his NBN plan than his ADSL as Telstra requires him to still have a copper phone line.

“That’s one thing that I’m a bit disappointed with,” he says. “There are no packages without that. We never used that home phone before because we’ve got mobiles, but we had to have it to get broadband.”

"Like others, Sanders says she is paying more for her Internet, but she is receiving a greater download limit. Previously paying $29.95 a month, she is now paying $49.95 a month and also has a phone line on the copper network with Telstra."

"She says she’s saving at least $100 per month on phone costs alone. In total, the saving is around $200 a month, factoring in phone line rental costs and cheaper calls. "

Rural Australia often has no choice for mobile but Telstra, especially in areas covered by Wireless NBN.
To get a halfway reasonable mobile pricing structure it has to be bundled with a landline - alternative pay a fortune for mobile calls.
In Rural areas mobile is essential.

Telstra will not offer Wireless NBN untill mid 2013, even then though Copper rental compulsory aspect of the bundle for better mobile pricing.

This compulsory Phone line rental for decent mobile plans will definitely discourage take up of the NBN for light users, plus the hassle of changing their email address.

As Telstra is the major Mobile Provider with the best service, especially rural often the only one (Thanks to Govt subsidies) , this impacts big time on rural NBN takeup. (Friends face just that issue and are big mobile users ).
Also impacts in towns and cities for light Internet users that are mobile especially heavy mobile users. Definitely impacts substantially on take up rates.
Those rates will unfortunately be ammunition against continuing the NBN as is by the Coalition - crippling our future for ever, it is the ONLY chance we have.

Odds are Telstra will end up being give "The NBN" to finish and run with taxpyer subsidies costing us billions over the years for a second rate service that will charge like wounded bulls and seek to handicap any competing RSP as with their Fibre and top hat products

Andrew

7

"Sending files of any size was an arduous process on her dial-up connection, which she was using until around 2010 when she was finally able to connect to ADSL.

With only 5GB of data, she frequently exceeded her limit, despite not downloading large files or streaming videos.

Oz feathers is now on an Internode 12/1Mbps plan."

A 12/1 plan is slower than ADSL2 speed.

Abel Adamski

8

Andrew
ADSL2+ is up to , upload and download speeds attained on ADS2+ not mentioned, average dowstrean speed Aust wide is 6Mb.
Note upload was the issue, better and stable

Abel Adamski

9

Steph, just a tad disappointed.
There is actually over 44% of NBN users there on better than ADSL2+ speeds, yet we quote 12/1 users with the exception of the pub

Steven

10

I would be choosing a plan with a higher upload speed if they want to upload video. 1Mbps is paltry for HD video these days.

Gavin Fielke

11

When thinking about the potential for the Coalition winning the next election and changing the NBN to FTTN I calm myself by saying that it would make sense for them to backflip and keep with FTTP if they are hoping to win the election after that as well.

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