Hitachi unveils first 10K rpm 1.2TB hard drive

The Ultrastar C10K1200 offers 33% more capacity than previous model

Hitachi Global Storage Technologies (HGST) today announced what it said is the industry's highest-capacity 10,000rpm, enterprise-class hard drive: the Ultrastar C10K1200.

The 2.5-in. drive comes in capacities of up to 1.2TB and features a serial-SCSI (SAS) interface, a 64MB cache buffer and 2 million hour mean-time between failure (MTBF) rating. The Ultrastar C10K1200 uses less than 5W during idle mode.

HGST, now owned by Western Digital, said the Ultrastar C10K1200 is targeted at 24x7 enterprise applications such as data mining/analysis, business processing and delivery of data-intensive content-on-demand such as multiple channels of streaming video.

The 1.2TB Ultrastar C10K1200 drive delivers 33% more capacity in the same 2.5-in. form factor as HGST's previous 10,000rpm drives. By using the new model in a 2U (3.5-in high) rack-mountable server with 24 drive bays, users can get up to 28.8TB of capacity.

Some Ultrastar C10K1200 models also offer data encryption for hardware level data security.

Lucas Mearian covers storage, disaster recovery and business continuity, financial services infrastructure and health care IT for Computerworld. Follow Lucas on Twitter at @lucasmearian or subscribe to Lucas's RSS feed. His e-mail address is lmearian@computerworld.com.

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More about: Hitachi, Hitachi Global Storage Technologies, SAS, Topic, Western Digital
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