Apple to retain tablet dominance

A total of 50 per cent of Australia's population will own a tablet by 2016, according to research by Telsyte.

The Australian love of digital tablets has shown no signs of abating, with Telsyte research revealing the tablet market has grown 188 per cent in the first half of this year.

A total of 2.37 million tablets are expected to be sold by the end of the year.

Telsyte says around 15 per cent of the population now owns a tablet, with this figure to increase to 30 per cent next year and to 50 per cent by 2016.

“Tablets have captured the imagination of the gadget-loving Australian public, with the mainstream adoption driving its rapid growth. The fastest growing user group is the over 55s,” Foad Fadaghi, Telsyte research director, told Computerworld Australia.

“Consumers are attracted to their simplicity and ease of use and are increasingly shifting their computing activities to tablets.”

Telsyte said the tablet market is being impacted by price competition, global litigation, such as that between Apple and Samsung, and an increase in the mainstream adopting the devices.

It said price is being impacted by newer, more affordable tablets, such as those without 3G and 4G connectivity, which are cheaper to manufacture. However, Telsyte said Wi-Fi--only tablets are growing in popularity.

Meanwhile, Telsyte said Apple remains a firm leader in the tablet market, retaining around three quarters of the market for the next 12 months or more. It also predicts Apple will release a smaller iPad by the end of this year.

“The arrival of new form factors could impact tablets, including convertibles or wearable computers, but we don’t foresee any of these impacting our forecasts for the next two years,” Fadaghi said.

“Some also believe that large smartphones (or phablets) might impact the media tablet market, but to-date, this has yet to occur.” Follow Stephanie McDonald on Twitter: @stephmcdonald0

Follow Computerworld Australia on Twitter: @ComputerworldAU

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