Online music streaming wars heat up with MOG

MOG offers streaming at 320kbps.

Telstra has entered the online music streaming arena with the launch of its MOG service.

The online music directory features 16 million music tracks at 320kbps quality and is available on PC, digital music players, Apple and Android smartphones, tablets and wireless HiFi systems.

Telstra is currently offering a two-week free trial of the music service and has thrown in an added incentive for Telstra customers – streaming data charges will also be free during the trial.

Following the free trial period, Telstra will charge $6.99 a month for using MOG via computers and $11.99 for additional streaming via mobile devices.

Users of MOG will be able to access songs offline by adding them to their mobile device and MOG Radio will allow users to search for artists and find similar music.

MOG is also incorporating Facebook ‘likes’ into the app, where users can personalise a playlist based on their likes.

Music subscription services have garnered fierce debate, with some musicians claiming they aren't fairly compensated, while others believe it is a positive for the music industry because it provides an alternative to music piracy.

Spotify recently launched in Australia, which accesses Warner Music, EMI, Universal, Sony and Australasian Performing Right Association music catalogues.

While the basic service with ads is offered for free, giving users access to 16 million songs, the app charges $6.99 for music streaming without ads and $11.99 for streaming with offline playback enabled at 320kbps.

Spotify was initially launched in Sweden in 2008 and in the US in July last year.

“More Australians are accessing music digitally than ever before, and Telstra’s research indicates the number one way Australians are listening to music is via their MP3 player or smartphone,” said Adam Good, Telstra director of digital media and content.

“Telstra’s research also found that 50 per cent of Australians haven’t bought a CD from a record store in the last year with 75 per cent of people saying it’s due to the cost of CDs or sighting constantly changing music taste as the reason.”

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More about: Apple, EMI, Facebook, Sony, Telstra
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