Encrypted solid state drives protect laptop data

Vendors are touting solid state replacement drives as a way to protect corporate data in the event of a laptop being lost or stolen, and to boost performance at the same time.

We tested five SSDs to determine if they, indeed, were encrypting data and if the encryption could be somehow broken. In other words, were they safe to use if the device were stolen from or with a notebook?

The answer is: summoning our best tools, we could not crack their encryption. Not only that, these drives delivered read and write speeds that were up to five times faster than the hard drives that came with our enterprise-grade laptops.

The products under test were 2.5 inch, SATA-3 replacement drives from Other World Computing (OWC), OCZ Technologies, Micron Technologies, Adlink Technology and Intel.

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More about: Intel, Micron, Micron Technologies, OCZ, Other World Computing, Technology
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