Bond Uni, Tata Consultancy sign IT education deal

Institutions will collaborate on research and development programs

Queensland-based Bond University’s School of Information Technology has partnered with Mumbai-based IT services firm, Tata Consultancy Services (TCS), for research and professional development programs.

School of Information Technology head, Dr Iain Morrison, said in a statement that the agreement would provide opportunities for information sharing, staff exchange programs and international industry experience for Bond’s academics.

“This agreement opens the door for us to work with TCS on a number of research projects, and to establish exchange opportunities between their industry researchers and our academics,” he said.

The School has also established partnerships with vendors including IBM and Microsoft – both of which now employ Bond graduates.

“I have high hopes that we will soon have graduates at Tata as well,” Dr Morrison said.

In April, Bond University enlisted the help of an online student recruitment tool developed by Blink Mobile Interactive to attract students, with information easily accessible via smartphones.

TCS has developed IT and business process systems for some of Australia’s largest companies including Qantas, Woolworths AGL, Foxtel, ING Direct and Vodafone Hutchison Australia (VHA).

Follow Hamish Barwick on Twitter: @HamishBarwick

Follow Computerworld Australia on Twitter: @ComputerworldAU

Join the Computerworld Australia group on Linkedin. The group is open to IT Directors, IT Managers, Infrastructure Managers, Network Managers, Security Managers, Communications Managers.

More about: AGL, Blink Mobile, Bond University, Foxtel, Hutchison, IBM, IBM Australia, ING, Microsoft, Qantas, Tata, Tata Consultancy Services, Technology, VHA, Vodafone, Woolworths
References show all
Comments are now closed.
Related Coverage
Related Whitepapers
Latest Stories
Community Comments
Tags: Bond University, Microsoft, education, IBM, Tata Consultancy Services
Whitepapers
All whitepapers

Free OS X Mavericks now powers half of all Macs

READ THIS ARTICLE
DO NOT SHOW THIS BOX AGAIN [ x ]
Sign up now to get free exclusive access to reports, research and invitation only events.

Computerworld newsletter

Join the most dedicated community for IT managers, leaders and professionals in Australia