Preview: Nokia Lumia 800 Windows Phone

Nokia's first Windows Phone gets the same look and feel as the MeeGo powered N9
The Nokia Lumia 800

The Nokia Lumia 800

It's been a long time coming but Nokia has finally unveiled its first Windows-powered smartphone, the Lumia 800. It shares an almost identical, physical design to the MeeGo-powered N9 but utilises the latest 7.5 "Mango" version of Windows Phone software.

Windows Phone 7.5 "Mango" review
Nokia N9 review

We described the Nokia N9 as the best looking and slickest device the company has ever produced, so it's no surprise to see the Nokia Lumia 800 use an almost identical design. It's a candybar handset constructed from solid polymer and manufactured from the same material often found in ice hockey helmets. Like the N9, the Lumia 800's polycarbonate casing is coloured all the way through in the manufacturing process, so scratches, dents or marks from everyday use will not show up. The Nokia Lumia 800 will be available in black, cyan and magenta colours.

The Nokia Lumia 800 has a slightly smaller 3.7in AMOLED screen compared to the N9's 3.9in screen, but it uses ClearBlack technology that claims better blacks and improved outdoor visibility. As the Lumia 800's screen is slightly smaller, it has a lower 480x800 resolution compared to the N9's 480x854 screen. The Lumia 800's screen is coated in Gorilla glass that Nokia says prevents scratches and cracks. The phone has no front-facing camera for video calls, but it has a dedicated camera shutter key: a standard requirement on all Windows Phones. The only other physical controls are on the right side in the form of volume buttons and a lock/power key. The bottom houses a speaker while a standard headphone jack, micro-USB port and a micro-SIM card slot are aligned on the top.

The Nokia Lumia 800 is powered by a single-core 1.4GHz Qualcomm MSM8255 processor, has 512MB of RAM and 16GB of internal memory. It also has an 8-megapixel camera with Carl Zeiss optics that doubles as a 720p HD video recorder.

If you're wondering why the Nokia Lumia 800 doesn't pack a dual-core processor and doesn't have a memory card slot it's because this hardware isn't supported in Windows Phones. Any Windows Phone device is forced to meet strict hardware requirements by Microsoft, including a capacitive, multitouch display with a minimum 800x480 resolution, a 1GHz or better processor, at least 256MB of RAM, a minimum of 8GB of internal storage, and a GPS receiver. All Windows Phone devices must also have an accelerometer and digital compass, an ambient light sensor, a 5-megapixel camera or better, an FM radio and seven buttons (back, Start, search, camera, power/lock, volume up/down).

These requirements make Windows Phone devices very similar, so physical design and exclusive software is the main differentiator between models. The Nokia Lumia 800 includes Nokia Drive, a free turn-by-turn GPS navigator, Nokia Music, a global music streaming application and ESPN Sports Hub, a sports app which is apparently exclusive to Nokia's Windows Phones. We can't judge until we get our hands on the Lumia 800, but only the Nokia Drive app seems like a worthy and very welcome inclusion. The Lumia 800 also includes a free 25GB of SkyDrive storage, but this is a feature available on all Windows Phones.

Unlike the N9, the Nokia Lumia 800 isn't a quad-band 3G device. There will be two models of the device sold in Australia — one that supports Optus and Vodafone's 900 and 2100MHz 3G networks, and another that works on Telstra's 850MHz Next G network.

The Nokia Lumia 800 will launch in various markets before the end of 2011, but it's not expected to hit Australian shores until early 2012. Pricing and Australian-specific availability has yet to be announced.

Join the Computerworld Australia group on Linkedin. The group is open to IT Directors, IT Managers, Infrastructure Managers, Network Managers, Security Managers, Communications Managers.

More about: MeeGo, Microsoft, Nokia, Optus, Qualcomm, Telstra, Vodafone
References show all

Comments

binaural meditation

1

The "correct" position for many of these is to be able to sit cross-legged. But the greatest correct position is regardless of what one it is possible to keep, which retains your back straight, and that is not hurtful (so that it doesn't distract from a Practice).

Wireless Network Consulting guy

2

this is very interesting. unfortunately. MS is trying to make PC's look like windows phones with Windows 8. I want my computer to look like a computer not a phone

Comments are now closed.
Related Coverage
Related Whitepapers
Latest Stories
Community Comments
Tags: Nokia Lumia 800, mobile phones, smartphones, Nokia, Windows Phone
Whitepapers
All whitepapers

Galaxy S5 deep-dive review: Long on hype, short on delivery

READ THIS ARTICLE
MORE IN Software Development
DO NOT SHOW THIS BOX AGAIN [ x ]
Sign up now to get free exclusive access to reports, research and invitation only events.

Computerworld newsletter

Join the most dedicated community for IT managers, leaders and professionals in Australia