Exetel releases mainland NBN pricing

Customers in Armidale, Kiama and Willunga will receive free instalment and no charge for the use of the fibre service until 30 September 2011

Exetel pricing for NBN mainland sites

Exetel pricing for NBN mainland sites

Less than a week after rival Internode announced pricing for the National Broadband Network (NBN), Exetel has revealed its prices for mainland NBN trial sites.

In a series of blog post, Exetel chief executive, John Linton, wrote that customers in the trials sites in Armidale, Kiama and Willunga had been sent “invitation emails” for free instalment and no charge use of the fibre service until 30 September this year, allowing them to retain their ADSL service and run the two side-by-side.

“On or before 30th September they select which service they would like to keep,” Linton wrote. “If they don't want to continue with the fibre service then they are not charged for it to be removed and they simply go back to using their ADSL service at their contracted price per month.”

Following 30 September, the ISP will charge a $100 installation fee and offer 12-month plans with five different data allowances available across 12 megabits per second uplink/1Mbps downlink, 25/5Mbps, 50/10 Mbps, 50/20Mbps and 100/40 Mbps services.

The cheapest start at $34.50 per month for 20 Gigabytes (GB) of data for speeds of 12/1Mbps, and reach up to $74.50 for 200GB of data. This is less expensive than Internode’s cheapest plan which starts at $59.95 per month phone and internet bundle for a 12/1Mbps connection and a 30GB data allowance.

The maximum plans offered with speeds of 100/40 Mbps range from $49.50 for 20GB up to 200GB for $99.50, compared with Internode’s most expensive plan which offers speeds of 100/40Mbps with a one Terabyte limit and costs $189.95 per month.

Once data limits are reached, excess data will be throttled at 512 Kilobits per second (kbps)/128Kbps.

According to Linton, pricing for the fibre service has been a “major issue” as the Federal Government claims the network will offer “more speed at the same price of ADSL2” and there was no fixed quotes from back haul providers to and from the NBN POIs.

“At 'NBN2's' wholesale pricing today that simply isn't going to happen....at least not from Exetel,” he wrote. “Why? Because the monthly port cost of the lowest speed fibre service and the 'back haul/CVC' cost is higher than even Trelstra (sic) Wholesale charge for an ADSL2 service.....and is almost double the cost of an Optus ADSL2 service.....and that the fibre cost is going to get much higher once the 'trial phases' end and the POIs [points of interconnect] move to their planned 121 locations instead of, as they now are, in CBD major data centres.”

The plans will also include VoIP services, for which Linton said Exetel customers would be receiving another email advising them how to test VoIP over their connection given they have compatible equipment or handsets.

“Assuming the Labor government's 'NBN2' proceeds as planned this provides a participating ISP with the opportunity of increasing the percentage of their customers who use the ISP's own VoIP service quite dramatically,” Linton wrote.

"It also poses a threat to 'stand alone' VoIP companies who will almost certainly see their businesses wiped out as, as far as I can see, there is no way that an end user won't use the 'free' VoIP service that every ISP will include in a Labor 'NBN2' service.”

More detail will be added to the Exetel NBN pricing, Linton said, as it draws closer to the time services will become available.

Communications minister, Senator Stephen Conroy, welcomed the competition by the retail service providers (RSPs) noting Exetel's entry level price of $34.50 was almost half that released by Internode and lower than the sub-$40 package announced by Dodo last week.

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Tags Exetel CEO John LintonExetelNational Broadband Network (NBN)internode

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2 Comments

Hydrans

1

This is more like it, it makes you question the logic behind Internode stating that it is being forced to price their product at this price by the NBN pricing regs.

Makes Internode look like Tel$tra now, really high markup for someone elses service.

So as much as it pains me to say this, either Julia loose the Carbon Tax or Tony take up the NBN to get my vote.

So where and when can I sign up for this 100Mbps plan?

Joe H

2

I am amazed at the business stupidity yet again of internode, they have not only put foot in mouth they then proceeded to shoot said foot.
Out of the research I did to find a provider and i,m still waiting on a few to release pricing but I was looking at a range of $34 to $50 per month to replace my currant $57 per month with voip im on already, I get slightly more speed for less than i,m paying now and that researched fact over one weekend, surely Internode could of done the same before they shot their mouth off.

Internode strikes me as having some problems all of their making in relation to their pricing, maybe having all your equipment in SA, top heavy inefficent management could be the cause either way their credibilty is somewhat trarnished.

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