Access your Twitter account on the run

You don't have to stay near your Web browser to read your tweets. Here's how to tap Twitter on any mobile phone.
  • (PC World (US online))
  • 09 April, 2010 05:33

Over the last couple days you've learned how to set up a Twitter account and make fun and practical use of the service. Now let's look at ways you can access Twitter without being tied to your PC.

For starters, if you have a cell phone (any cell phone--doesn't have to be anything fancy like a Droid or iPhone), you can take advantage of Twitter's SMS features to send and receive tweets.

First, open Twitter in your browser, click Settings, and then click Mobile. Follow the instructions to pair your phone with your Twitter account. With that done, any text message you send to 40404 becomes a tweet.

You can also elect to receive tweets via SMS from selected people you follow. However, because standard messaging rates apply, high-volume tweeters could end up costing you. Also, frequent SMS interruptions can prove annoying. My advice is to receive SMS tweets only from important, news-bearing sources.

A better bet all the way around is to find a Twitter app for your phone--assuming your phone runs apps, that is. They're available for all the major platforms: Android, BlackBerry, iPhone, WebOS, Windows Mobile, etc.

These apps let you tweet, retweet, send direct messages, view your feeds, and so on. Many of them are free; others cost a couple bucks. If you're wondering, I'm partial to TweetDeck for iPhone (pictured).

What's your preferred method for using Twitter on the go?

Join the Computerworld Australia group on Linkedin. The group is open to IT Directors, IT Managers, Infrastructure Managers, Network Managers, Security Managers, Communications Managers.

More about: BlackBerry, TweetDeck
References show all
Comments are now closed.
Related Coverage
Related Whitepapers
Latest Stories
Community Comments
Tags: twitter
Whitepapers
All whitepapers

Galaxy S5 deep-dive review: Long on hype, short on delivery

READ THIS ARTICLE
MORE IN Virtualisation
DO NOT SHOW THIS BOX AGAIN [ x ]
Sign up now to get free exclusive access to reports, research and invitation only events.

Computerworld newsletter

Join the most dedicated community for IT managers, leaders and professionals in Australia