Budde: Worries remain over ISP-level content filter

Questions will continue to be raised over ISP-level content filter according to leading telco analyst

The Federal Government's decision to go ahead with a controversial ISP-level content filter will raise more questions than it answers, according to a leading telecommunications analyst.

Speaking to Computerworld, Buddecomm director, Paul Budde, said he was worried the move by Senator Stephen Conroy to push ahead with the content filter to block URLs that received a Refused Classification rating by the ACMA in the face of considerable public backlash was setting a precedent for the future.

"With Refused Classification, I have no issue with that – it's not the sort of information that any normal person would want so I have no issue with that," he said. "I am worried about embarking on this; what does it lead to? What will be added to it in future by all the political parties and other people? That is my worry."

In November, Budde, said the lack of communication on its ISP-level filtering plans, and its refusal to set a date for the release of its findings, suggested that the Government’s plans had been shelved.

But after much delay the Federal Government released the results of Enex TestLab’s test pilot into mandatory ISP-level content filtering, finding that a technically competent user could circumvent filtering technology based on ACMA’s blacklist.

According to the report, initially all filters had issues with loading the ACMA blacklist indicating a need for routine checking to ensure the blacklist is filtered correctly with each update.

On the up side, testing also revealed that ISPs filtering only the ACMA blacklist during the trial had no noticeable performance degradation that could be attributed to the filter itself.

"I don't think you will ever get, on the Internet, something that works 100 per cent," Budde said. "There is no way in the world. Particularly in contentious situations like this there are a lot of people who make it their hobby or aim in life to get through it and make it available to everyone that wants it.

"I think that will be an uphill battle. In that respect the whole legislation will be interesting. How is it enforceable? How can you enforce something that operates like liquid – today it is here tomorrow it is not? Are you then going to sue the ISPs for not being able to do things like that? So there are so many angles to it."

More information on the Federal Government's plans can be found on the Department of Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy website.

The full Enex Testlab report can also be downloaded at the same site.

Sign up for Computerworld's newsletters.

Got a tip? Email Computerworld or follow @computerworldau on Twitter and let us know your thoughts.

Tags internet content filteringpaul buddemandatory internet fiteringSenator Stephen ConroyAustralian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA)Telecommunications

More about Enex TestLab

6 Comments

Anonymous

1

Which part of "it won't work" does the government not understand?

Anonymous

2

@Anon, don't you worry about that. The Minister for (lack of) Communications, like most before him, hasn't got a clue about how the Net works. His secret government censorship won't do anything to stop the pedophiles he always references with his misleading "it will save the children" mantra.

It's really just to cynically screw everybody while pursuing senate and electorate votes from the well meaning but technically ignorant, and creating the opportunity to impose secret censorship of whatever a future govt considers inappropriate - which sooner or later will include opposing political views.

No politician, from any party, will be able to resist the power to secretly ban anything that disagrees with their party line. In the interests of the state, of course.

Anonymous

3

So we not only want to sell to China.. We also want to be Fascists like them too!

Peter Manuel

4

I already can not get a comment published in support of the Monarchy, Climate Scepticism and Liberal politics. Conroy now wants to filter content he does not like. This is censorship by Conroy and Rudd. Very dangerous and not necessary.

Anonymous

5

Rudd you are an idiot if you think this will protect children from the nasties in the world. The freaks are loose on our streets and in our so-called most trusted establishments - ie schools, and churches and other caring bodies. STOP HUNTING VOTES FROM THE IGNORANT!

Jahm Mitt

6

The great thing about all of this religious or "culty" guff, is that all the sheeple groveling in their steeple, they all have "opinions" about what their deity is "saying" and righteously so, but the deity in the last few thousands of years of "omnipotence", has never once put in a personal appearance.

You know like if "JC and the Space Cadets" were a rock band - the clueless would have caught on that while the promoters claim that they play in gigs all over the land, but they have never turned up; while the clueless and stupid keep rocking up and buying the tickets.

Losers.

So the same overlording us with more holier than thou drivel, is projected into the area of computer games and internet sites.

Again while people get slaughtered for fun and profit in the movies and the real world, playing computer games doing the same stuff is just not on?

Why?

Am I surprised that the people thrusting their liturgical loins at the censors office for "standards and decency" are not trying to put the shackles on those who choose to have their own autonomous opinions, by declaring them to workers of the devil, sorcery and witches - starting with the jabbings for the devils mark.

Am I even further surprised that this is now extending into the Great Australian Firewall.

Perhaps those who cry loudest are those who look forlornly upon the promises of the bible, such as Ezekiel 23: 21 "whose members were like those of donkeys, and whose emission was like that of stallions."

I mean who wouldn't want that or to be getting that?

I mean thank god Conroy is standing up for real Christian family values.

Jesus said in Revelation 2:22-23 "And I will kill her children with death; and all the churches shall know that I am he which searcheth the reins and hearts: and I will give unto every one of you according to your works."

So Jesus wants to kill our kids - that's cool cause it is Jesus.

Timbo says I Timothy 2:11-14 "Let the women learn in silence with all subjection. But I suffer not a woman to teach, nor to usurp authority over the man, but to be in silence."

So all the women ought to keep their traps shut. I mean it's in the bible - so it must be true right.

And God digs killing pregnant chicks by knifing them and smashing their kids brains out on the ground; so the christians have got this family values stuff down pat: Hosea 13:16 "Samaria shall become desolate; for she hath rebelled against her God: they shall fall by the sword: their infants shall be dashed in pieces, and their women with child shall be ripped up."

So Conroy and his catholic buddies have got this right - we have to be protected against them out there on the internet and subjugate ourselves to the righteous christians showing us how their god loves us and how we ought to be kissing his ass, on the basis of their say so.

Oh did I mention that the old testament is a scammed copy of the Code of Hammurubi? The King of Babylons state laws - and the first 6 books of the bible are bare faced rip offs of this, just rebranded to a diety instead of the king?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Code_of_Hammurabi

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:The_code_of_Hammurabi.pdf

Yep gotta remember them good old christian family values, the true word of god is the bible... except that getting nailed for copyright and plagarisim wasn't invented then.

Comments are now closed

Amazon vs. Google vs. Windows Azure: Cloud computing speed showdown

READ THIS ARTICLE
DO NOT SHOW THIS BOX AGAIN [ x ]
CIO
ARN
Techworld
CMO